We use cookies to improve your experience. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more Accept and Close
Non-Emergency Enquiries: 101

Human Trafficking

Involves an act of recruiting, transporting, transferring, harbouring or receiving a person through a use of force, coercion or other means, for the purpose of exploiting them. If an identified victim of human trafficking is also an adult with care and support needs, the response will be co-ordinated under the adult safeguarding process.

Human trafficking involves an act of recruiting, transporting, transferring, harbouring or receiving a person through a use of force, coercion or other means, for the purpose of exploiting them. If an identified victim of human trafficking is also an adult with care and support needs, the response will be co-ordinated under the adult safeguarding process. The police are the lead agency in managing responses to adults who are the victims of human trafficking. There is a national framework to assist in the formal identification and help to coordinate the referral of victims to appropriate services, known as the National Referral Mechanism.  

Possible Indicators:

Signs of various types of slavery and exploitation are often hidden, making it hard to recognise potential victims. Victims can be any age, gender or ethnicity or nationality. Whilst by no means exhaustive, this is a list of some common signs:

  • Adult is not in possession of their legal documents (passport, identification and bank account details) and they are being held by someone else
  • The adult has old or serious untreated injuries and they are vague, reluctant or inconsistent in explaining how the injury occurred
  • The adult looks malnourished, unkempt, or appears withdrawn
  • They have few personal possessions and often wear the same clothes
  • What clothes they do wear may not be suitable for their work.

The adult is withdrawn or appears frightened, unable to answer questions directed at them or speak for themselves and/or an accompanying third party speaks for them.  If they do speak, they are inconsistent in the information they provide, including basic facts such as the address where they live

They appear under the control/influence of others, rarely interact or appear unfamiliar with their neighbourhood or where they work. Many victims will not be able to speak English, have fear of authorities or the adult perceives themselves to be in debt to someone else or in a situation of dependence.