We use cookies to improve your experience. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more Accept and Close
Non-Emergency Enquiries: 101

Bats Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q:

    Can you help an injured bat?

    A:

    It is not illegal to take a disabled bat for the sole purpose of tending to it and releasing it when no longer disabled, as long as that person can show that it was not disabled unlawfully by them. It is not illegal to kill a bat, as long as that person can show that the bat was so seriously disabled, other than by their own unlawful act, that there was no reasonable chance of it recovering.

  • Q:

    Where are bats usually found?

    A:

    Most bats live in trees and buildings where they cause little disturbance and are often undetected. They are usually only seen around dusk when they come out to feed.

  • Q:

    What do bats eat?

    A:

    All bats native to the UK eat insects. Each species has its favourite insects, hunting them in its own way. Most are caught and eaten in mid air, though it is sometimes easier for the bats to hang upside down to eat larger prey.

  • Q:

    If I want to extend or build a property and find bats, what should I do?

    A:

    Those concerned with property development - whether as an individual or within the building trade - must ensure they have a proper regard for wildlife and ensure they are aware of - and comply with - the relevant legislation. Under Regulation 41 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010, it is an offence to damage or destroy a breeding site or resting place of a European Protected Species of animal which includes all bats, even if that site or place is no longer in use. This is an offence of strict liability; there does not have to be evidence of any intent or even recklessness. If the breeding site or resting place is damaged or destroyed, the offence is complete. If you carry out any works in or on a building in which bats are present or which bats have been using to roost or hibernate, you must contact Natural England for guidance prior to commencing work.